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Pupil Premium

Pupil Premium Strategy Statement

 

What is the Pupil Premium Grant?

The pupil premium is additional funding for publicly funded schools in England to raise the attainment of disadvantaged pupils and close the gap between them and their peers. Pupil premium funding is available to:

· local authority maintained schools, including special schools and pupil referral units (PRUs)

· voluntary-sector alternative provision (AP), with local authority agreement

· special schools not maintained by the local authority (NMSS)

· academies and free schools, including special and AP academies

In order for school’s to receive the Pupil Premium Grant, parents must apply for Free School Meals, even if your child already receives a free school meal or does not want to access a free school meal at school.

Who is eligible for Free School Meals (FSM)?

The GOV.UK website explains that a child may be eligible for free school meals (FSM) if his/her parents are in receipt of any of the following benefits:

· Income Support Income-based Jobseekers Allowance (JSA)

· Income-related Employment and Support Allowance (ESA)

· Support under part VI of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999

· The guaranteed element of State Pension Credit

· Child Tax Credit, provided the parents are not also entitled to Working Tax Credit and have an annual gross income of no more than £16,190

· Working Tax Credit run-on, which is paid for four weeks after you stop qualifying for Working Tax credit

· Universal Credit

The GOV.UK website adds: Children who get any of the above benefits in their own right can also get FSM. Children under the compulsory school age who are in full-time education may also be able to get FSM

Please note that this does not include all children in school years from Reception to Year 2 who are eligible for Universal Infant Free School Meals, as this is a different scheme.

The Pupil Premium Grant is only allocated to those children entitled to Free School Meals because their parents/carers are in receipt of one the benefits above and have been means tested (eligibility is not automatic on receipt of one of the above benefits, it has to be applied for).

Aim

To ensure that children from disadvantaged backgrounds are able to make the same progress as, or better progress than, their peers.

 

Principles

  • At Parkway Primary School, we organise teaching and learning in order to best meet the needs of all of our children.
  • We arrange appropriate provision for children from vulnerable groups and for those who may be disadvantaged, to ensure that their needs are accurately assessed and met.
  • We recognise that not all children who receive free school meals will be disadvantaged and we also recognise that not all children who are disadvantaged have free school meals. We follow the government’s guidelines to allocate Pupil Premium support to those children who receive, or have received, free school meals, or who are in care.
  • We aim to include parents (along with our own needs analysis and including input from staff in school) to decide how the Pupil Premium could be best spent for each child.
  • It may be the case that not all children receiving free school meals will receive Pupil Premium interventions at any one time.

Key Expenditure 2016-2017

Last year the school received £ 110,880 from the Pupil Premium Grant, of which £ 110,880 was spent. The number of pupils who attracted the Pupil Premium Grant in September 2016 was 76 children. Below are the ways in which we have spent the money to support pupil progress during the academic year 2016-2017:

Description

Cost (£)

One to one support – Qualified teacher x 2

21,594

Tutorial groups in core subjects

8,403.48

Booster Groups

7,822.76

Learning Mentor

22,015.92

Funding for school trips (including Year 6 residential, Shakespeare festival), Clubs and uniform

4,724.20

Bird College, music input

4,365.96

Phonics intervention

4,195.37

Additional classroom support for 1:1 and group work

37,758.31

 

How will parents know the money is having an impact?

It is important to remember that the Pupil Premium Grant is not specifically allocated to those pupils who attract the grant. The purpose of the grant is to raise the attainment of disadvantaged pupils and close the gap between them and their peers. Not all of our ‘disadvantaged’ pupils apply for FSM and therefore the school must use the money it does receive to raise the attainment of others who also need further support.

We track all pupils’ progress so we can quickly see if your child is not making the progress that they should do. If your child has difficulty in an English or mathematics lesson, their needs targeted intervention to ensure that they keep up with the peers and achieve expected progress. All pupils’ start the year at different points in their learning but the aim is to ensure that all pupils reach at least the expected standard for their year group by the end of the year. This does mean that a small number of pupils may need a more tailored intervention to target areas of learning which they are missing. Usually, if your child needs a more tailored intervention programme, a member of the Senior Leadership Team will be involved in supporting and monitoring the progress of the children, in tandem with the class teacher.

Attainment of disadvantaged pupils in 2016-2017 Foundation Stage [8 pupils]

 

Reading

Writing

Number

Emerging

25%

25%

13%

Expected

75%

75%

88%

Exceeding

0%

0%

0%

 

Key Stage One (TA in the mainstream) [9 pupils]

 

Reading

Writing

Mathematics

Working Towards Age Expected Standard

17%

33%

17%

Working At Age Expected Standard

83%

67%

83%

Working in Greater Depth

11%

11%

33%

 

Key Stage Two (in the mainstream) [12 pupils]

 

Reading

Writing

Mathematics

Working Towards Age Expected Standard

50%

42%

42%

Working At Age Expected Standard

50%

58%

58%

Working in Greater Depth

8%

0%

0%

 

Funding - Financial year 2016 to 2017

In the 2017 to 2018 financial year, schools will receive the following funding for each child registered as eligible for free school meals at any point in the last 6 years:

· £1,320 for pupils in Reception to year 6

· £300 for pupils in year groups reception to year 6 recorded as Ever 6 Service Child or in receipt of a child pension from the Ministry of Defence

· Schools will also receive £1,900 for each pupil who has left local-authority care because of 1 of the following:

o adoption

o a special guardianship order

o a child arrangements order

o a residence order

If a pupil has been registered as eligible for free school meals and has also left local-authority care for any of the reasons above, they will attract the £1,900 rate.

Children who have been in local-authority care for 1 day or more also attract £1,900 of pupil premium funding. Funding for these pupils doesn’t go to their school; it goes to the virtual school head (VSH) in the local authority that looks after the child. VSHs are responsible for managing pupil premium funding for looked-after children.

Impact

At Parkway, the Pupil Premium has been having a positive impact and it has allowed Disadvantaged Children access to support through our one to one and group support, this delivery of personalised English & Mathematics tutoring allowing pupils to make accelerated progress regardless of their starting points. Monies are also used to support learning experiences, purchase equipment and subsidise educational visits. Importantly, the Pupil Premium also allows us to fund the school's learning mentor who is able to work closely with children as needed.

2017-2018 Pupil Premium Strategy

This year the school received £113,520 from the Pupil Premium Grant. The number of pupils who attracted the Pupil Premium Grant in September 2017 are 76 children.

Below are the ways in which we intend to support pupil progress during the academic year 2017-2018

 

Proposed Expenditure for 2017-2018

Description

Cost

Staff Leading

Review action

Impact/Evidence

PP HLTA group work

£12,887

SLT – Assistant Head Teacher

½ termly Pupil Progress Meetings

 

PP teacher group work

£9,827

SLT – Assistant Head Teacher

½ termly Pupil Progress Meetings

 

Phonics booster teacher group work

£4,360

SLT – Deputy Head Teacher

½ termly Pupil Progress Meetings

 

Nursery nurse extra support in reception

£2,328

SLT – Assistant Head Teacher

½ termly Pupil Progress Meetings

 

SLT intervention work

£26,995

SLT

½ termly Pupil Progress Meetings

 

Learning mentor

22,327

SLT – Assistant Head Teacher

1:1 fortnightly meetings with AHT

 

School Journey subsidy

£2,000

SLT – Assistant Head Teacher

Pupil Progress Meeting in December

 

TA intervention work

£48,465

Class Teachers

Deputy Head Teacher

½ termly Pupil Progress Meetings

 

Music Input

£4,366

Music Lead

½ termly Pupil Progress Meetings

 

Shakespeare initiative

£960

Year 5 teacher

Pupil Progress Meeting in December

 

Funding of school

trips, activities, clubs

and uniform for

individual pupils

 

£500

Class Teachers

Finance Officer

Ongoing

 

After school clubs

£500

SLT - Deputy Head Teacher

Office Manager

Termly SLT meeting

 

Purchasing of

resources to improve

classroom teaching

 

£1,000

Subject Leads

Finance Officer

Termly SLT meeting

 

 

A summary of the main barriers to educational achievement/progress faced by eligible pupils at the school.

In-school barriers

· The progress of PP children is slower compared to their peers and the gap is not closing enough

· Targeted support teaching provided by qualified teachers rather than TAs

· Targeted teaching for higher ability PP pupils has not historically been focused enough to develop greater depth at the end of KS1 or 2

· Assessment systems clearly identify next steps needed in learning to accelerate progress

· Intervention strategies having a focused measurable target when being delivered

· Specific Speech and Language support needed for a selection of PP pupils throughout the school

External barriers

· Attendance rates for eligible PP pupils are below those of non PP, resulting in reduced progress and attainment

· Parental involvement does yet fully contribute to accelerated progress of all PP pupils

· PP families requiring specific support for a range of needs including housing and mental health

· Experiences, external to the classroom and home, which allow contextual learning and confidence building

Outcomes for 2017-2018

Desired outcomes and how they will be measured (to address the barriers).

Focus areas

Success Criteria

1

Reading : To raise the attainment of disadvantaged pupils and close the gap between them and their peers.

School data shows that the percentage of disadvantage children have attained to the same standard as the percentage of non-disadvantaged at both the expected and greater depth in reading.

2

Writing: To raise the attainment of disadvantaged pupils and close the gap between them and their peers.

School data shows that the percentage of disadvantage children have attained to the same standard as the percentage of non-disadvantaged at both the expected and greater depth in writing.

3

Maths: To raise the attainment of disadvantaged pupils and close the gap between them and their peers.

School data shows that the percentage of disadvantage children have attained to the same standard as the percentage of non-disadvantaged at both the expected and greater depth in maths.

4

Reading : To accelerate the progress of disadvantaged pupils and close the gap between them and their peers.

School data shows that the percentage of disadvantage children have made accelerated progress which has resulted in their attainment mirroring that of the percentage of non-disadvantaged at both the expected and greater depth in reading.

5

Writing: To accelerate the progress of disadvantaged pupils and close the gap between them and their peers.

School data shows that the percentage of disadvantage children have made accelerated progress which has resulted in their attainment mirroring that of the percentage of non-disadvantaged at both the expected and greater depth in writing.

6

Maths: To accelerate the progress of disadvantaged pupils and close the gap between them and their peers.

School data shows that the percentage of disadvantage children have made accelerated progress which has resulted in their attainment mirroring that of the percentage of non-disadvantaged at both the expected and greater depth in maths.

7

Assessment: To identify areas/gaps in learning which require teaching and learning to close gaps.

School data shows gaps for disadvantaged children have been closed in learning and the rate of these closures are at least in line with non-disadvantaged children.

8

Interventions: To use the assessment system to identify specific needs to be taught and to teach them.

School data shows identified needs for disadvantaged children have been addressed in learning and this is reflected in the % of disadvantaged children at age expected standard mirrors non-disadvantaged children’s data.

9

Attendance: To ensure attendance of all PP children is at least at 96%.

Attendance of all disadvantaged children is at least 96%.

10

Enrichment: To enable disadvantaged pupils to reach their full potential and provide them with opportunities their non PP peers have access to.

During book looks there is evidence of experience provided by school enrichment has impacted positively on the child’s learning.

11

Parental engagement: To ensure hard to reach parents of PP children are engaging in a positive way with the school.

Parents have met with teachers for extended consultations and this has impacted on progress made by child being above the average progress made by non-disadvantaged children in the class.

12

Wellbeing: To nurture the Possible actions wellbeing of all disadvantaged pupils.

Soft data reflects a growing confidence and enjoyment of being in school.

 

Pupil Premium Strategy Statement 2017/2018

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